Delights of broad beans and wine | Brief letters

Guardian and Observer charity appeal | Broad beans | Vinotherapy | Moscow, Cumbria | Sack José

On behalf of your readers, I would like to thank all of you who gave up their Saturday to answer the phone for your charity appeal (£40,000 boost on one day from telethon, 17 December). Your paper is what has kept me sane this year, and the privilege of speaking to one of your journalists was something I would not have missed.
Barbara Foster
Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire

• How delightful to read about Mark Cocker planting broad beans in his dark black soil (Country Diary, 18 December). Only he could make this activity so interesting and educational. He might like to know that my broad beans “Aquadulce”, planted several weeks ago, are now flourishing and around four inches tall in my vegetable patch some 20 miles further south in Norfolk.
Ron Brewer
Old Buckenham, Norfolk

Continue reading… JARDINERO ESTEPONA JARDINERÍA ESTEPONA

How to grow trees in a small garden | James Wong

Think you don’t have the space for a tree in your garden? The simple solution is to use pots

As we head towards midwinter all seems quiet in the garden, but now is the perfect time for the most exciting of horticultural new beginnings: planting a tree. Worry you don’t have the space? Gardening on concrete? Concerned about the foundations of your house? There is a simple solution to all of these common problems: grow a small tree in a pot. This is often overlooked so, in an effort to change that, here’s a round up of the best species for pot culture, which will work well in even the tiniest of city gardens.

The most commonly suggested candidate for this treatment is an olive – and with good reason. They are evergreen, have character from a young age and, hailing from the often thin soils of the Med, don’t mind the root restriction and the faster rate of drying out that inevitably happens in containers. The ability of small trees in pots to be sited up against the walls of houses without affecting foundations means these exotic trees can benefit from the warm microclimate the brickwork creates as it absorbs heat in the day to then emit it overnight.

Hailing from the often thin soils of the Med, olive trees don’t mind the root restriction

Continue reading… JARDINERO ESTEPONA JARDINERÍA ESTEPONA

Stuck for gift ideas for the gardener in your life?

Seeds, string and secateurs… A few present suggestions for the green-fingered people you know

All I want for Christmas is a steaming pile of manure, though I’m always happy to be given seed. Brown Envelope Seeds in West Cork does a Christmas card packed with seed. I like their ‘Peas on Earth’, and their gift boxes, too. I have ordered a Baby’s First Dinner Box for a friend who brings her newborn to the allotment. I’d love to find a Tomato Rainbow Box under our tree. I am also taken with Piccolo seeds, packaged like posh chocolate bars, a fine gift for any kitchen gardener. Or a sweet pea selection from Roger Parsons. I have a hankering for his Spencer or Old-Fashioned mixes.

Earlier this year, we lost our Implementations copper trowel, though I’m still hoping to discover it buried with the beetroot. A straight replacement of a shiny Castor trowel would make me happy on Christmas morning. I am almost addicted to their dibber and my short-handled Phoenix hoe.

Continue reading… JARDINERO ESTEPONA JARDINERÍA ESTEPONA

How to ease a cold with herbs

Our gardening export on how common culinary herbs can make brilliant medicines

There’s nothing like a long-distance flight to test your immune system – my neighbour spluttered while the row behind hacked and the other side sniffled. Once home, and with the day the right way up, I lost no time in gathering some herbs to keep those germs at bay. The common cold is a beast, I believe, that cannot be tamed – you just have to ride it out – but a choice handful of our common culinary herbs are brilliant medicine. And they are far kinder to you, the environment and your purse than many over-the-counter cold medicines.

Rosemary and sage are classic herbs for colds and sore throats. Both are known for their antimicrobial and antiviral properties. Rosemary is said to stimulate the circulatory system and thus is thought to encourage blood flow to the brain to relieve headaches. I find a steam inhalation of a handful of bruised stems and leaves works wonderfully for blocked sinuses.

Related: How to grow narcissus paperwhite | Alys Fowler

Continue reading… JARDINERO ESTEPONA JARDINERÍA ESTEPONA

Deck the halls: 21st-century Christmas wreaths and table arrangements

Conjure your own winter creations from foraged foliage and florist’s stems. The key: anything goes

Dried chillies, lavender, feathers and palm fronds: these are not your usual Christmas wreath ingredients. But by combining more unexpected plants and flowers with seasonal staples – pine, conifer, eucalyptus, say – you can create displays that venture far beyond holly, ivy and mistletoe. Nik Southern, owner of London- and Essex-based florist Grace & Thorn, mixes fresh materials with dried foliage or flowers, forages for many ingredients and is liberal with the spray paint.

“Whether you’re going to your local woods or taking a walk down by the canal, keep your eyes open for things you could use, and later dry or spray for different effects,” she says. “Be careful with picking berries if you’re not sure what they are, though. And keep an eye out for great shapes and textures that you could layer together.”

Continue reading… JARDINERO ESTEPONA JARDINERÍA ESTEPONA

Gardening tips: plant a lovely shrub for lemon-yellow blooms

Plus, frostproof your pots and visit one of the UK’s wonderful arboretums

Plant this Prizes for the least catchy name ever go to Coronilla valentina subsp. glauca ‘Citrina’, but this relative of the humble pea makes a wonderful small shrub for a sheltered, sunny spot with sharp drainage. It’s covered in lemon-yellow blooms from winter to late spring. Height and spread: 80cm x80cm.

Raise this Plant pots may have spent all summer frazzled and dry, but waterlogging can easily kill plants now winter is here. Use pot feet or bricks to raise containers from the ground and stop water pooling around the base. If you’re not sure if pots are frostproof, wrapping with bubble wrap may prevent damage.

Continue reading… JARDINERO ESTEPONA JARDINERÍA ESTEPONA

Meet the mites who’ll keep plants bug-free

Here’s the professional solution to indoor pests

With the exploding interest in houseplants, I am increasingly flooded with questions about how to deal with indoor pests. It seems to be a particular problem at this time of year as people bring plants, which have been holidaying on the patio over the summer, indoors and with them come unwanted hitchhikers. The closer confines of plants now arranged more densely facilitates the spread of the pests from host to host, and sealed in the warm, cosy environment of a living room, without the normal summer predators, populations can quickly start to build. And as plant growth rate tends to slow in the lower light levels of winter, they can become more susceptible to infestations, which they might shrug off in summer.

While I tend to adopt a far more laissez faire approach to pests outdoors, this unique combination of factors means that many normally relatively fuss-free plants, such as alocasia, plumeria and brugmansia can become a real challenge (if not almost impossible) to overwinter. That’s before we get on to the dripping of sticky honeydew these critters can create, ruining upholstery and wooden surfaces. As someone who has had his fair share of all the above (and, trust me, it pains me every time), I decided to go straight to the source to ask commercial growers for their evidence-based techniques for tackling pests in the great indoors.

My own number one winter nemesis is the red spider mite

Continue reading… JARDINERO ESTEPONA JARDINERÍA ESTEPONA

Allotment anxiety: I’m injured and can’t visit – will it miss me? | Allan Jenkins

Allan Jenkins is convalescing and fretting over his abandoned plot of land

I am currently exiled from the allotment, confined to a room facing our roof terrace, hoping the assorted narcissi and tulip bulbs will soon burst through and admiring the hellebores.

An old injury has returned to haunt me and now I am stuck to my bed like a butterfly pinned to a board, for at least a couple of weeks. I am a bit desolate. Some of my happiness is tied to nurturing a small piece of land and I am not sure that it will understand.

Continue reading… JARDINERO ESTEPONA JARDINERÍA ESTEPONA

Gardening with Allen Wilson: Health, creativity are gardeners’ reward – The Columbian


The Columbian

Gardening with Allen Wilson: Health, creativity are gardeners' reward
The Columbian
Gardening keeps my mind active. A lot of people ask me questions. I often have to search to find answers. In the process, I run across other interesting information that I wasn't looking for. It gets me into my library of horticultural books. The

JARDINERO GUADALMINA JARDINERÍA JARDINERÍA LA ZAGALETA JARDINERO

Cuidados del pino

El pino es un género importante que se encuentra compuesto por 100 especies distintas, casi todos originarios del hemisferio norte. Algunas de las especies son de desarrollo muy pequeño y demora varios años en llegar al metro de altura, siendo ideales para el balcón, el patio y la terraza. Las otras especies pueden superar los 30 o […] JARDINERO SOTOGRANDE JARDINERÍA SOTOGRANDE

The Hoosier Gardener: Celebrate your Christmas book flood – Indianapolis Star


Indianapolis Star

The Hoosier Gardener: Celebrate your Christmas book flood
Indianapolis Star
The Christmas Cottontail is a rabbit that was rescued by Santa, taken to the North Pole and taught about – what else? – gardening and how to reward good gardeners. Her story is perfect for reading aloud to a favorite child, or an easy read for young

JARDINERO GUADALMINA JARDINERÍA JARDINERÍA LA ZAGALETA JARDINERO

Magic Leap’s Seedling showed me the challenges of AR gardening – CNET


CNET

Magic Leap's Seedling showed me the challenges of AR gardening
CNET
Magic Leap's Seedling showed me the challenges of AR gardening. Living with virtual plants in the real world is a game of subtleties. by. Scott Stein. December 5, 2018 6:00 AM PST. seedling-screen03. This comes pretty close to what it looks like to use …
Seedling on Magic Leap Is the Most Relaxing Space Gardening Game You'll Never PlayGizmodo



los 8 artículos informativos »

JARDINERO GUADALMINA JARDINERÍA JARDINERÍA LA ZAGALETA JARDINERO

Don Davis: A December gardening to-do list – Lynchburg News and Advance


Lynchburg News and Advance

Don Davis: A December gardening to-do list
Lynchburg News and Advance
Gardening activity of some kind is always happening. That includes December, a time when some plants are dormant and others have just begun to grow and bloom. Seed and plant catalogs for 2019 have already started to arrive in the mail. The cold days of …

JARDINERO GUADALMINA JARDINERÍA JARDINERÍA LA ZAGALETA JARDINERO

Naked women cleaning biz smashes patriarchy by introducing naked bloke gardening service – The Register


The Register

Naked women cleaning biz smashes patriarchy by introducing naked bloke gardening service
The Register
Lazy perverts of all genders, get in here. Australia has the household service for you. Bare All Cleaning, which sends women round to do chores in the buff, has hit back at claims of sexism by rolling out a gardening service performed by naked blokes.

JARDINERO GUADALMINA JARDINERÍA JARDINERÍA LA ZAGALETA JARDINERO

For ‘weedless gardening’ next spring, begin now – Washington Post


Washington Post

For 'weedless gardening' next spring, begin now
Washington Post
I take a four-pronged approach to keeping my vegetable and flower gardens free of weed problems, and suggest you try it. First, keep dormant weed seeds asleep by not tilling or otherwise churning the soil. (All soils contain many weed seeds that lie

JARDINERO GUADALMINA JARDINERÍA JARDINERÍA LA ZAGALETA JARDINERO

Take back control – could self-sufficiency be the answer to a no-deal Brexit?

I moved with my husband and kids to rural Kent to try to grow our own food to alleviate even the harshest crisis next year. Unfortunately, crops are as complicated as the latest withdrawal agreement

In January 2017, my husband, Jared, and I moved our family from a semi in Ramsgate to a ramshackle house in rural Kent that came with two acres of mud. Our desire for change was born of the political, social and environmental turmoil. There was certainly a naive pursuit of the good life, but we were also reeling from the outcome of the Brexit referendum and feeling sick about Trump’s presidency. We needed a personal survival plan.

In the face of a world shifting in a direction we could no longer understand, predict or rely on (and despite having no practical skills or experience), we sought a shared vocation that was less tied to systems and structures that appeared to be wobbling. We planned to grow and raise some of our own food and – as wildfires, floods and landslides hinted at the impact of climate change – move towards a more sustainable way of life. It felt like a personal resistance that would be good for our family life and physical and mental health, as well as teaching us new skills.

Continue reading… JARDINERO ESTEPONA JARDINERÍA ESTEPONA

Gardening: 10 gift suggestions for a green-thumbed loved one – The Columbus Dispatch


The Columbus Dispatch

Gardening: 10 gift suggestions for a green-thumbed loved one
The Columbus Dispatch
If there's a gardener or a garden lover on your Christmas list, you're in luck. Whatever your budget, he or she will be easy to please. From affordable accessories to extravagant splurges, here's a roundup of gifts certain to delight. Houseplants. With
All the Dirt on Gardening: Gifts for gardenersMuskogee Daily Phoenix


Some gift ideas to make it easy on your favorite gardener — and yourselfThe News Tribune

los 6 artículos informativos »

JARDINERO GUADALMINA JARDINERÍA JARDINERÍA LA ZAGALETA JARDINERO

Make your garden to-do list, and check it twice – Independent Tribune


Independent Tribune

Make your garden to-do list, and check it twice
Independent Tribune
*Prepare your soil for spring: Most gardeners wait for spring to amend their soil, but fall is a good time to add soil amendments like manure, compost, and bone meal. In most climates, adding nutrients at this time of year means they'll have time to

JARDINERO GUADALMINA JARDINERÍA JARDINERÍA LA ZAGALETA JARDINERO

Winter gifts for gardeners – Santa Fe New Mexican


Santa Fe New Mexican

Winter gifts for gardeners
Santa Fe New Mexican
Lately my thoughts have turned to gifts for friends and family. If you have gardeners on your list, the options are many. While I don't recommend giving large plants, which may turn into unwelcome projects, small succulents are easy to care for. An
All the Dirt on Gardening: Gifts for gardenersMuskogee Daily Phoenix


Some gift ideas to make it easy on your favorite gardener — and yourselfThe News Tribune
10 gift suggestions for a green-thumbed loved oneThe Columbus Dispatch

los 6 artículos informativos »

JARDINERO GUADALMINA JARDINERÍA JARDINERÍA LA ZAGALETA JARDINERO

Green-fingered gifts

Give plants and seeds to keep growers happy at Christmas

If you are a gardener, you’ll know the feeling. Come Christmas, the immense pressure to act delighted as you unwrap a boot brush in the shape of a hedgehog, a fibreglass solar light or (yet another) pair of novelty gardening gloves. So, in an effort to break the cycle, here’s a list of my all-time favourite independent suppliers of quirky, fun and interesting gifts for gardeners, all of which are online.

With a name like plants4presents.co.uk, you might be forgiven for thinking that this nursery would just stock the typical supermarket gift options, like poinsettia and hyacinths in festive pots. But think again. I discovered the friendly owners of this small East Sussex supplier about five years ago at the Hampton Court Flower Show and have been hooked ever since. They have a stunning array of weird and wonderful edible indoor plants, some of which are impossible to track down anywhere else. From kaffir limes, right down to the wonderfully fragrant (and surprisingly cold tolerant) Japanese yuzu, their range of unusual citrus is pretty unbeatable.

Continue reading… JARDINERO ESTEPONA JARDINERÍA ESTEPONA

December is a chance for wildlife housekeeping | Allan Jenkins

Hang bird balls, clean equipment and ponder the riches in your garden

I am tempted to tell you to do nothing much in December. Except, perhaps, to cloche or cover any vulnerable crops you care about particularly, say, chicories or pigeon-friendly kales; to lift leeks and store your root crops if frost is looking imminent. Dig over empty ground now. It will be harder in the coming months.

Rocket, corn salad, land cress and winter purslane should still do fine under cover outside or on a sunny windowsill. Plant raspberries and blackberries if you haven’t already. It’s time, too, for pruning fruit trees, though best leave cherry or plum until spring.

Continue reading… JARDINERO ESTEPONA JARDINERÍA ESTEPONA